What if there was an alternate reality where…

Studio Notes

Hmm. Thought experiments.

What if? What if I could stop this?

What if I didn’t say anything?

What if there were reprisals?

What if I put my mental health at risk?

What if there was no support network for after the ordeal?

All valid thoughts. All eventually had answers.

So far, so good, this month has been great! After dealing with a few unpleasant things over the last few months, this month has been the best in a long time.

I’ve just got back from a brief family visit to England and am now looking into what is probably going to be the most strenuous change of lifestyle since I moved abroad.

RedHeat, June 2004

A man who I knew would still be preying on young boys was found still abusing children but nobody had come forward to do anything about it. Without any evidence, the authorities would not intervene, until I arrived in England, back on the scene. He was sent to trial and then to prison on my testimony.

Take that, you bastard.

This caused so much turbulence in my life, it took many years of help to overcome the trauma of the trial as well as the brutally refreshed memories of the past. The truth is the abuse happened to me and nothing will change that but what I didn’t understand for so long is that I have nothing to feel guilty about. What I did was right.

I am finally at peace.

The piece below is from some time between 2003 and 2004, it took months to set the above in motion, so naturally it reflected in my music. Looking back from 2022 it is clear there is a shy tone of despair in this piece. Just know that everything turned out alright.

A fairly simple piano piece with light instrumentation.

Equipment used:

  • Roland XP60 Synthesiser
  • Emu ESI4000T Digital Sampler
  • Emu Ultra6400 Digital Sampler
  • Unitor AMT8 Midi Patch-bay
  • Terratec 24/96 Audio Interface
  • Cakewalk Pro Audio 9

Cover:

  • Apple iPad Pro 4th Generation
  • Shapr3D iOS CAD – 3D modeling and visualization
  • Procreate iOS – Composition
  • MOLDIV iOS – Post production

Cover Art

Performed By: Redheat

Album UPC: 194171475498

Label: Redheat

Released: 2003

ISRC: ushm21987507

Year: 2003

Genres: Instrumental Piano

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A Return to Marwinia: the Forest’s Promise of an Escape, the story behind RedHeat’s: The Escape from Marwinia.

A hop, skip and jump, falling, fighting, victories, frights, revelations, reconciliation and ultimate involuntary sacrifice to the madness of the sentient forest.

Originally composed in 2005 and recorded while performed from a combination of orchestral and electronic instruments, the evocative soundtrack whisks the listener on a journey across a bizzaare twisted world where fantasty meets a crazed glimpse into the mind and life experiences of the artist.

Cover Art

Listen if you dare venture out from this cursed land

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Red Reflections: Renewal Rejuvenation & Relaxation

Red Reflections track, a timeless beautiful new-age track from RedHeat – Sonic Soundscapes. Featuring brand new cover art reimagining its musical soundscape in unprecedented detail.


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Cover Art

NewAgeMusic.guide: Hanami Nights

Hanami Nights featuring Ilona-Ruby Cover Art

RedHeat’s new single “Hanami Nights” is a 5 minutes long WOW moment! We already knew that this UK born, Netherlands based artist was talented. The new single is a giant leap for this music project. “Hanami Nights” is a chilled and laid-back piece with a catchy melody – as beautiful as illuminated cherry blossoms, which is the inspiration behind the song. This is indeed a perfect moment to become a RedHeat fan!

“Hanami Nights” is a delightful and positive piece, perfect for warm summer afternoons. When you hit play, don’t be surprised if you find yourself looking for the replay button. “Hanami Nights” is like a cherry blossom that never goes out of bloom…

BT Fasmer. Newagemusic.guide

RedHeat is a musician and composer specializing in instrumental epics. He recently released an album called “Origins”. It is an album designed to be played end to end, with each piece flowing into the next for an hour of soothing relaxation, promoting mental wellness through mental stimulation with uplifting themes interspersed with gentle meditative parts. Read our “Origins” review here. Also, check out this list of RedHeat’s other releases.


Listening to “Hanami Nights” got me thinking about Shannon M. Mullen’s famous quote: “Due to their short blossom time, Sakura blossoms are a metaphor of life itself: beautiful yet fleeting.”

This quote seems even truer when reading the song’s back story; “The trees and flowers begin to awaken in the spring sun. As she does too from her long hibernation. For my dearest, Ilona-Ruby. In November 2018 Ilona received the news that there was a problem that needed urgent attention, as many know Cancer is one of those things that scare the heck out of people, and it sure did for us.»

“Hanami Nights” has a very long build-up, over 2 minutes. But the time is well-spent. RedHeat successfully creates a lot of anticipation for what’s to come; It is like waiting for light to be turned on to illuminate nighttime cherry blossoms. First some gentle synths are heard, then guitar and a bass. Already at this stage the delicate Eastern flavors are easy to notice. Suddenly we are rewarded with the theme. Wow, what a warm, positive and uplifting melody RedHeat has in store for us!

The guitar segment is truly inspired, perfectly accompanied by layers of synth and a light rhythm. It is Chill, Tropical House and New Age music in perfect harmony. Wonderful!

Perhaps the best part is the production itself. It is very light, not overproduced in any way. RedHeat has 100 % confidence in the melodic qualities, so there’s no need for more effects or additional layers. Hopefully RedHeat will continue marking music as elegant as this.

The Lake

The Mastbos is a nearby forest in the city of Breda, it has a spectacular landscape and is a great place to go for a gentle stroll.

This video was shot on one of the sunny days a few weeks after Ilona-Ruby’s last radiotherapy. It was good to be outside again.

The music is composed for this video, its everything and its nothing. Inspired by Mike Oldfield, it leans heavily on some of his greatest riffs. Enjoy: The Lake.

NewAgeMusic.guide: Origins

April 25th 2019.

Review of Origins (album)

Sometimes a cover artwork tells little or nothing about the music inside – and sometimes it tells the whole story. The cover of RedHeat’s new release “Origins” contains a picture of deep space combined with a part of a tubular bell – famously used in Mike Oldfield’s 1973 bestselling album. At first glance, it looks eclectic, or even eccentric. But when you get to know the album, you’ll see that it is like a decryption code to RedHeat’s world of music. Read on to learn more about this fascinating, bold and different piece of music!

Redheat is a British contemporary musician and composer specializing in instrumental epics. “Origins” is designed to be played end to end, with each piece flowing into the next for an hour of soothing relaxation, promoting mental wellness through mental stimulation with uplifting themes interspersed with gentle meditative parts.

Return to Marwinia

The album opener is called “Return to Marwinia (Excerpt).” Fans of Mike Oldfield will immediately be greeted by a familiar sound; I’m extremely impressed by RedHeat’s adaptation of Oldfield’s quite complex musical expression. It even has the same playfulness and humor; I found myself expecting a caveman to appear (spoiler alert; there’s no caveman…). At the same time I must stress that this is not a MO tribute recording, but an original work of art. You don’t have to be a Mike Oldfield fan to enjoy “Origins.”

“Return to Marwinia (Excerpt)” has the atmosphere of a fantasy novel. Flutes and guitars guide us into a magical world. There are many nice twists and turns, and I very much enjoy the intertwining melodies. There’s even a talking spaceman in the end, making me change the scenery from fantasy to sci-fi in my mind. The 8-minute-long song seems to fly away, confirming that “Origins” is off to a promising start!

Just a Robot

Next song is “In the Light.” It has the coolness and attitude of a 1970s rock song, something by The Doors perhaps. But when the xylophone part comes on, Jim Morrison is all forgotten, and we are safely back in Oldfield’s realm. It all could have been a segment of “Return to Ommadawn,” it is that good. RedHeat is definitely on par with the master himself, pushing the boundaries of music and creativity.

“Origins” flows beautifully as one track, and before we know it a robot is on to us! “Just a Robot” has a delightful squeaky sound and a rhythm custom-made for robot dancing. There are also some delicate Eastern flavors here, confirming that the robot has a Made in China sticker.

Falcon Heavy

There’s a back story to the next song that deserves to be told. RedHeat writes: “Falcon Heavy was composed on the night that SpaceX launched and broadcast the very first Falcon Heavy rocket carrying Elon Musk’s old Tesla Roadster with the now iconic spaceman at the wheel. As such, this piece is a personal reflection of the time, greatly inspired by the spectacular views of Earth broadcast live from the rocket and the Roadster as it was launched into space.” The almost nine-minute long song is like an EP within the album, taking us on a memorable trip into space. RedHeat captures the atmosphere of Musk’s ambitious project perfectly.

Upon Horseback

On “Upon Horseback” we are safely back on Earth, getting ready for a ride. Here a Mike Oldfield quote seems fitting: “In summer, winter, rain or sun, it is good to be on horseback.” It is a fabulous piece! RedHeat explores melodic elements that are dear to all Oldfield fans, and adds some nice and personal effects (like the chiptune intro). It all has the quality of “Return to Ommadawn”, it is that good. The song effortlessly flows into “Tubular Dogs”. My only comment here is: “Isn’t that charming? Do you know, I really feel I could dance! Ah-ha-ha-ha-ha” (Margaret Thatcher voice, Mike Oldfield’s “Amarok”, 1990).

Aether

If you think “Origins” is an Oldfield tribute album, the next song will change your mind. “Thinking Time” is a fast, ambient styled song with a fascinating atmosphere. This is thinking on a grand, Big Bang scale. Time truly feels relative while listening to it. I very much like the reverb effect and how the lead synth bounces from side to side. It is so fast that it almost can’t keep track with the rest of the rhythm.

“Aether” takes us back into space, on an epic mission. The analogue sounding strings give the song a larger-than-life feel, a touch of Jean Michel Jarre. It also has a lovely playful vibe, with both spaceman chatter, statics and computer game effects.

Be Geezy

Before we know it “Be Geezy” has taken over the stage. The song is built around an incredible synth effect, a distorted techno bell, and a bright piano and fresh rhythm fill in nicely. It is excellent sound design. “Digi Hastus, V 1.0” takes it even further, showing RedHeat’s impressive skills as a sound producer. “The Cassini Theme” ends the album with the same precision as space probe, which plummeted into Saturn on September 15, 2017 – successfully completing Cassini-Huygens’ multi-decade mission.

In conclusion 

I’ll end this review where I started; focusing on the cover. “Origins” by RedHeat is a fresh, bold and innovative release, perfect for stargazing, dreaming and thinking. The cover shows a part of a tubular bell, which indicates the importance of Mike Oldfield’s music. But it is only a part of the picture, “Origins” is so much more. A Lao Tzu quote springs to mind: “Music in the soul can be heard by the universe.” “Origins” takes us there, into space and back, reminding us not to take it all too seriously. Let’s “Be Geezy”!

Score: 94/100 – See how I rate music here

BT Fasmer – Newagemusic.guide

Tubular Bells III: iPad Pro Test Drive

Models created in Shapr3D, textured in Procreate, Rendered in Matter, composited in Luma Fusion, all on a freakishly fast first of its kind iPad- the iPad Pro. The compositing can run in realtime.

Music by Mike Oldfield.

3D models created by hand, with the exception of the radar data modelling Asteroid Bennu (from Earth-based radar) provided by NASA.

Update: Thanks Sally 🥰

CTGMusic.com: Escape from Marwinia

29th May 2007

It’s a redheat tune. It’s epic. It’s everything I would expect it to be, and here’s why:-

It’s been a year now since I first heard this, and as with the fantastic Discovery, I’ve taken the same approach with reviewing it – take a years worth of listening, to see if I still feel the same way. I have to say, I dont feel the same about it, as I did last year – it’s grown more on me.

The tune starts off nice and slow, and builds into some sort of grand party of some sort, then suddenly the mood changes, and a kind of sadness fills the air…

There is a fanfare that offers hope, then suddenly the entire track turns into a mad struggle for survival, the tempo gets fast, the melodies get fast, and BAM, in drop one a fabulous piano melody, which itself goes fanfare itself, still with the high energy tempo, and it’s incredibly gorgeous on my ears… Inspiring, definately. Inspiring.

Makes you want to get up from the lazy chair and do somethign amazing for yourself… You can’t though, how could you leave this tune?. Impossible. at 3:26, the tempo drops, the mad rush is over, and we’re now treated to a mellow part, with some victorious bells playing over some pizzacato plucks, which lead into a short melody, and then, lead to a slow build, with some crystal sounding glockenspiel melody…. its amazingly epic…

Suddenly, there is the start of something, a march starts to play away in the backgound, slowly building, then …. then…….BANG in comes darkness, really eerie sounds play, like you’re lost in a dark forrest at midnight, and something is chasing you.

It’s really something, and it keeps you right there at the end of your seat. Trust me, music was made for telling stories, and redheat shows he is a master of his game.

After the darkness, the is a oboe? lead, chased by a violin, then without warning, the theme changes swiftly to a very immensly playful tune, like some sort of hobgoblins drinking, arguing, fighting, andf generally being silly and obnoxious…. Awesome. And there we have it. The tune is sadly, over.

Overall this track is a brilliant as it is technically excellent and audially orgasmic. I cannot think of a single reason to not give this less than 10/10, because to me, it’s flawless.

A year ago, I couldn’t help make comparisons to Discovery, and that is the main reason I chose to wait a year to review it. I was right to do this, because today, there are no comparisons to be made, this has nothing to do with Discovery, this is Escape From Marwinia! and I wont ever forget it.

By Martin Kilner aka Slammy