NASA OsirisREX: Asteroid Bennu

We have discovered the heart of Bennu, on the asteroid itself!

For visibility I have rotated and colourised it below 🙂

Boulder #1

The image was taken by the MapCam camera on NASA’s OSIRIS-REx spacecraft on April 19, from a distance of 2.2 miles (3.6 km). For scale, the largest boulder is 190 ft (58 m) wide, which is about the width of a soccer field.

When the image was taken, the spacecraft was over the southern hemisphere, pointing MapCam south.

Origins Reviewed

By BT Fasmer – NewAgeMusic.guide – April 25th 2019.

Sometimes a cover artwork tells little or nothing about the music inside – and sometimes it tells the whole story. The cover of RedHeat’s new release “Origins” contains a picture of deep space combined with a part of a tubular bell – famously used in Mike Oldfield’s 1973 bestselling album. At first glance, it looks eclectic, or even eccentric. But when you get to know the album, you’ll see that it is like a decryption code to RedHeat’s world of music. Read on to learn more about this fascinating, bold and different piece of music!

Redheat is a British contemporary musician and composer specializing in instrumental epics. “Origins” is designed to be played end to end, with each piece flowing into the next for an hour of soothing relaxation, promoting mental wellness through mental stimulation with uplifting themes interspersed with gentle meditative parts.

Origins

Return to Marwinia
The album opener is called “Return to Marwinia (Excerpt).” Fans of Mike Oldfield will immediately be greeted by a familiar sound; I’m extremely impressed by RedHeat’s adaptation of Oldfield’s quite complex musical expression. It even has the same playfulness and humor; I found myself expecting a caveman to appear (spoiler alert; there’s no caveman…). At the same time I must stress that this is not a MO tribute recording, but an original work of art. You don’t have to be a Mike Oldfield fan to enjoy “Origins.”

“Return to Marwinia (Excerpt)” has the atmosphere of a fantasy novel. Flutes and guitars guide us into a magical world. There are many nice twists and turns, and I very much enjoy the intertwining melodies. There’s even a talking spaceman in the end, making me change the scenery from fantasy to sci-fi in my mind. The 8-minute-long song seems to fly away, confirming that “Origins” is off to a promising start!

Just a Robot
Next song is “In the Light.” It has the coolness and attitude of a 1970s rock song, something by The Doors perhaps. But when the xylophone part comes on, Jim Morrison is all forgotten, and we are safely back in Oldfield’s realm. It all could have been a segment of “Return to Ommadawn,” it is that good. RedHeat is definitely on par with the master himself, pushing the boundaries of music and creativity.

“Origins” flows beautifully as one track, and before we know it a robot is on to us! “Just a Robot” has a delightful squeaky sound and a rhythm custom-made for robot dancing. There are also some delicate Eastern flavors here, confirming that the robot has a Made in China sticker.

Falcon Heavy
There’s a back story to the next song that deserves to be told. RedHeat writes: “Falcon Heavy was composed on the night that SpaceX launched and broadcast the very first Falcon Heavy rocket carrying Elon Musk’s old Tesla Roadster with the now iconic spaceman at the wheel. As such, this piece is a personal reflection of the time, greatly inspired by the spectacular views of Earth broadcast live from the rocket and the Roadster as it was launched into space.” The almost nine-minute long song is like an EP within the album, taking us on a memorable trip into space. RedHeat captures the atmosphere of Musk’s ambitious project perfectly.

On “Upon Horseback” we are safely back on Earth, getting ready for a ride. Here a Mike Oldfield quote seems fitting: “In summer, winter, rain or sun, it is good to be on horseback.” It is a fabulous piece! RedHeat explores melodic elements that are dear to all Oldfield fans, and adds some nice and personal effects (like the chiptune intro). It all has the quality of “Return to Ommadawn”, it is that good. The song effortlessly flows into “Tubular Dogs”. My only comment here is: “Isn’t that charming? Do you know, I really feel I could dance! Ah-ha-ha-ha-ha” (Margaret Thatcher voice, Mike Oldfield’s “Amarok”, 1990).

Aether
If you think “Origins” is an Oldfield tribute album, the next song will change your mind. “Thinking Time” is a fast, ambient styled song with a fascinating atmosphere. This is thinking on a grand, Big Bang scale. Time truly feels relative while listening to it. I very much like the reverb effect and how the lead synth bounces from side to side. It is so fast that it almost can’t keep track with the rest of the rhythm.

“Aether” takes us back into space, on an epic mission. The analogue sounding strings give the song a larger-than-life feel, a touch of Jean Michel Jarre. It also has a lovely playful vibe, with both spaceman chatter, statics and computer game effects.

Be Geezy
Before we know it “Be Geezy” has taken over the stage. The song is built around an incredible synth effect, a distorted techno bell, and a bright piano and fresh rhythm fill in nicely. It is excellent sound design. “Digi Hastus, V 1.0” takes it even further, showing RedHeat’s impressive skills as a sound producer. “The Cassini Theme” ends the album with the same precision as space probe, which plummeted into Saturn on September 15, 2017 – successfully completing Cassini-Huygens’ multi-decade mission.

In conclusion: I’ll end this review where I started; focusing on the cover. “Origins” by RedHeat is a fresh, bold and innovative release, perfect for stargazing, dreaming and thinking. The cover shows a part of a tubular bell, which indicates the importance of Mike Oldfield’s music. But it is only a part of the picture, “Origins” is so much more. A Lao Tzu quote springs to mind: “Music in the soul can be heard by the universe.” “Origins” takes us there, into space and back, reminding us not to take it all too seriously. Let’s “Be Geezy”!

Score: 94/100 – See how I rate music here

Make sure to visit & follow RedHeat’s homepage

Hanami Nights

There is something quite addictive about this new release by RedHeat, it’s called Hanami Nights and has that delicate eastern flavour within the music that is so appealing. The build and progression of this single and its electronic nature is pristine and beautifully produced.

RedHeat has indeed manifested something very special in this moody, yet exciting offering, one that I am sure listeners would be more than eager to purchase; this is a wonderfully fluent and colourful single indeed and one that I personally rate very highly.

by Steve Sheppard – One World Music Radio.

Released on 6th June 2019, Hanami Nights is a Tropical House flavored New Age track, themed upon Japanese pentatonic scale with traditional instruments combined with a western Celtic touch.

Hanami Nights entered the New Age music charts at #8 on New Age Music Guide Top Ten for the month of June 2019, scoring a 8.1/10.

Tubular Bells III: iPad Pro Test

Models created in Shapr3D, textured in Procreate, Rendered in Matter, composited in Luma Fusion, all on a freakishly fast first of its kind iPad- the iPad Pro. The compositing can run in realtime.

Music by Mike Oldfield.

3D models created by hand, with the exception of the radar data modelling Asteroid Bennu (from Earth-based radar) provided by NASA.

Child of the Dogstar

I’ve always had a thing for rotating things that resemble the motion of cogs turning in the mind, windmills spinning in the breeze, space probes flying through space, gyrating for their time-delay integrated image systems…(like Juno).

So it took over 20 years to track down one of my favourire children’s TV series- eventually discovering some terrible quality rips from someone’s VHS on YouTube, excellent!

But where’s the official release? I did some research only to find out that the reason there had not been an official home VHS or DVD release was down to the copyrights “being stuck in litigation limbo” with NZTV for over 20 years!

So no VHS or DVD releases until the late 2000s.

One must understand: this TV program was aired ONCE in the UK in the 1980s- of those few Saturday mornings that I did get to watch TV, I accidentally stumbled upon the very first episode which was a blessing, and got immediately hooked. Sci-Fi kids TV was rare.

I’m no 3D designer, so I really have no idea what I am doing and that’s why I find it fun to do. Using a demo version of Shapr3D on my iPad Pro, I created a series of models.

Below are some of the stages of the model design as well as some clips of source material from which this device originates.

This isn’t my first replica built either- I did build a replica when I was a kid out of cardboard and electronics, but of course, no photographs and nothing survived!

Over the course of it’s airing, Saturday mornings were delightfully punctuated by this eerie and seemingly malevolent device’s wishes to draw enough energy by [no spoilers] to make contact with its home/owners- I highly recommend watching the mini-TV series “Children of the Dog Star”, just for the fact its great B-quality Sci-Fi. See what you come away with- try and understand what it would have been like for an impressionable 7 year old like me.

Fig Biscuits!

Behold the wise lion as it bops along to authentic Chinese traditional vocal reggae song –

Bringing a young child’s (Izzi Rambelje, aged 5) drawing of a lion to full 3D glory, literally the cutest sunshine head in the world.

Travelling Light

In the year of 2016, a change of pace and creative direction- photographic artwork inspired by light, jet turbines and the smell of kerosine in the dark at the local airport during a stint of experimentation with night capture software and processing, basically just to see what I could do within the limitations of the then-current iPhone hardware.

All pictures were taken with iPhone 4 & 5, limiting the quality and resolution somewhat, but the results are pleasing.

Each capture takes approximately 45 minutes to an hour to make, then composition of the exposures done (also on the iPhone). Ilona-Ruby and myself were at the airport on such a regular basis we became quite familiar with the awesome staff and employees at the various establishments within the terminal 🙂

The view is astonishingly beautiful especially at sunset as the terminal has been deliberately built to take the positioning of the sunlight to make maximum use of it within the building itself as well as a pleasant place to sit on the panorama terrace, upstairs and outside with a full unobstructed view of the entire airfield and a head-on view of nearly all of the gates with S2 being directly in front and center.

The New Building Collapsed

During the time we spent at the airport there had also been the construction of a new multipurpose building that included several stories of car parking, and it was almost complete and ready to open when a large portion of it suddenly collapsed. This was a building meant to have people in it!

The collapse happened on the one day we weren’t there. Typical! We had been at the airport every day but one that week. Luckily, nobody was injured. 👀 ✈️

Meanwhile, at arrivals…

Update 2018

The collapsed building has been completely torn down and another, bigger building exactly the same building but without the epic construction faults and failures has being constructed in its place.

Estimated completion date for the new building is October 2019. The damage to the collapsed building came to about €22,000,000 (About $25 million US dollars). I am glad it is all sorted out now and look forward to seeing what the airport looks like later in 2019.

The investigation into the cause of the collapse did not find anything odd, the most probable cause was materials failure as it dried in the unusually hot heatwave that struck the Netherlands that week.

Update 2020: The speculation on the probable cause was wrong, the fault lay completely with the construction company.

The Dutch Safety Board investigation found the load bearing floor panels had been installed incorrectly, leading to catastrophic structural integrity failure.

Eindhoven Airport and BAM reach agreement on financial settlement parking garage

Eindhoven Airport and construction company BAM reached an agreement on the financial settlement of the incident of 27 May 2017, in which the parking garage at Eindhoven Airport partially collapsed. Fortunately no casualties occurred during the incident.


At the beginning of April 2018 BAM started with the rebuilding of the parking garage. Completion is planned for October 2019. The parties do not make any further announcements regarding the content of the agreement reached.


“We are pleased that with this agreement we can put a stop to financial settlement and we can focus on the future”, says Joost Meijs, general manager of Eindhoven Airport.


“The settlement fits within the provision made by BAM in the fourth quarter of 2017,” says Jaap Hazeleger, director BAM Bouw en Techniek bv. “The rebuilding is progressing well.”


Eindhoven / Bunnik, 2 January 2019
Source

But wait, there’s more…

Update 2020

The Dutch Safety Board did an interesting video (in English) about this entire story. Check it out!